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Saturday, August 20, 2011

HEALTH & PREGNANCY: Shift work may have little effect on pregnancy!


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zeenews.india.com / Saturday, August 20, 2011,09:11.

Shift work may have little effect on pregnancy

New York: Some studies have suggested that working the night shift may raise a pregnant woman`s risks of preterm labor or having an underweight baby. But a new review says that if those effects exist, they are likely to be small.

Looking at 23 studies involving thousands of women, researchers found that, overall, shift work was not strongly linked to the risk of preterm labor, versus the standard 9-to-5 job.







Women working night or rotating shifts did have a slightly higher chance of having a baby who was underweight or "small for gestational age" -- meaning small for the baby`s sex and the week of pregnancy during which he or she was born.

Still, the evidence was not strong enough to make "confident conclusions," the researchers report in the obstetrics journal BJOG.

Together, the results suggest that any effects of shift work on preterm delivery and birth size "are likely to be small," write the investigators, led by Dr. Matteo Bonzini of the University of Insubria in Italy.

New York: Some studies have suggested that working the night shift may raise a pregnant woman`s risks of preterm labor or having an underweight baby. But a new review says that if those effects exist, they are likely to be small.





Looking at 23 studies involving thousands of women, researchers found that, overall, shift work was not strongly linked to the risk of preterm labor, versus the standard 9-to-5 job.

Women working night or rotating shifts did have a slightly higher chance of having a baby who was underweight or "small for gestational age" -- meaning small for the baby`s sex and the week of pregnancy during which he or she was born.

Still, the evidence was not strong enough to make "confident conclusions," the researchers report in the obstetrics journal BJOG.

Together, the results suggest that any effects of shift work on preterm delivery and birth size "are likely to be small," write the investigators, led by Dr. Matteo Bonzini of the University of Insubria in Italy.

In theory, irregular work hours could affect a woman`s reproductive function by throwing off the body`s natural "clock" and disrupting normal hormonal activity.


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